Influences: Lin Carter

Linwood Vrooman Carter (1930-1988) was a prolific fantasy writer, averaging six books a year during his most productive years. He is best known for his work in the 1970s as editor of the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series, which introduced readers to many overlooked classics of the fantasy genre.

His best-known works are his sword and planet and sword and sorcery novels in the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs, Robert E. Howard, and James Branch Cabell. His first published book, The Wizard of Lemuria (1965), first of the “Thongor the Barbarian” series, combines both influences. Although he wrote only six Thongor novels, the character appeared in Marvel Comics’s Creatures on the Loose for an eight-issue run in 1973-74 and was often optioned for films, although none were produced.

His other major series, the “Callisto” and “Zanthodon” books, are direct tributes to Burroughs’ Barsoom series and Pellucidar novels, respectively.

Although, Carter brought little innovation to the genres he worked in, he was instrumental in introducing a new generation to the works of past masters…both through his own work and the anthologies he edited.

Often criticized as a shameless self-promoting, unoriginal writer (creating many “posthumous collaborations” and pastiches of deceased authors’ worlds, characters, and story notes), his influence on modern fantasy and science fiction cannot be ignored.

Must Reads:

Thongor & the Wizard of Lemuria

Thongor of Lemuria

Thongor Against the Gods

Thongor in the City of Magicians

Thongor at the End of Time

Thongor Fights the Pirates of Tarakus

Simrana Cycle

The Black Star

Jandar of Callisto

Black Legion of Callisto

Sky Pirates of Callisto

Mad Empress of Callisto

Mind Wizards of Callisto

Lankar of Callisto

Ylana of Callisto

Renegade of Callisto

 

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